lettersfromtitan:

This is the greatest hipster CD booklet insert ever.

lettersfromtitan:

This is the greatest hipster CD booklet insert ever.

(Source: bruitist)

Tags: Goat Get Killeng

lettersfromtitan:

nocturnecity:

All-time favourite film, especially after the restoration.

I saw the Giorgio Moroder version for my 12th birthday.  It still informs so much of my everything.

Class strife, the life of the city, the intersection of fame and gender, mysticism and technology, death.

(Source: opsena)

kiecho:

a—fri—ca:

Mangbetu women’s clothing, Medje village, Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), 1970 - Photo by Eliot Elisofon
“The photograph depicts woman wearing traditional barkcloth ‘negbe’. The main item of women’s clothing was a rectangular barkcloth garment called ‘nogetwe’. Worn like a short skirt or sometimes like an apron, it was left open to reveal the ‘negbe’, or back apron. Women generally wore barkcloth when they were not at work and when strangers were present.” (Schildkrout E., Keim C., 1990: African Reflections, University of Washington Press)
(National Museum of African Art - Smithsonian Institution)

kiecho:

a—fri—ca:

Mangbetu women’s clothing, Medje village, Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), 1970 - Photo by Eliot Elisofon

The photograph depicts woman wearing traditional barkcloth ‘negbe’. The main item of women’s clothing was a rectangular barkcloth garment called ‘nogetwe’. Worn like a short skirt or sometimes like an apron, it was left open to reveal the ‘negbe’, or back apron. Women generally wore barkcloth when they were not at work and when strangers were present.” (Schildkrout E., Keim C., 1990: African Reflections, University of Washington Press)

(National Museum of African Art - Smithsonian Institution)

(via diasporicroots)

gacougnol:

Sigourney Weaver in her graduation photo

gacougnol:

Sigourney Weaver in her graduation photo

(via lettersfromtitan)

Phantom faces at the windows.
Phantom shadows on the floor.
Empty chairs at empty tables
Where my friends will meet no more.

Stop making me feel stuff!  *shakes fist*

(Source: buckybarnesing, via captainofalltheships)

"Ever wonder what happens to all the condoms that fail the quality control test? Artist and social activist Adriana Bertini crafts gowns out of them. Bertini’s"

"The bird a nest, the spider a web, man friendship."

— William Blake, Proverbs of Hell from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (via sol-psych)

(via clothedinsky)

markruffalo:

This is kind of embarrassing. You have American’s who can’t find the heart to help these people so now we have the Canadians coming to the rescue. We are thrilled to spend trillions of dollars in war in other countries to “Help Them” but can’t find the heart to put these people on a payment plan they can afford. “Values”?

torrilla:

……

According to “Joss Whedon: The Biography,” in stores August 1, Hiddleston, who plays antihero Loki in the film, wrote Whedon a heartfelt email after reading Whedon’s draft for the first time.

We’ve published Hiddleston’s letter in full along with Whedon’s response with permission from Chicago Review Press below.

Joss,

I am so excited I can hardly speak.

The first time I read it I grabbed at it like Charlie Bucket snatching for a golden ticket somewhere behind the chocolate in the wrapper of a Wonka Bar. I didn’t know where to start. Like a classic actor I jumped in looking for LOKI on every page, jumping back and forth, reading words in no particular order, utterances imprinting themselves like flash-cuts of newspaper headlines in my mind: “real menace”; “field of obeisance”; “discontented, nothing is enough”; “his smile is nothing but a glimpse of his skull“; “Puny god” …

… Thank you for writing me my Hans Gruber. But a Hans Gruber with super-magic powers. As played by James Mason … It’s high operatic villainy alongside detached throwaway tongue-in-cheek; plus the “real menace” and his closely guarded suitcase of pain. It’s grand and epic and majestic and poetic and lyrical and wicked and rich and badass and might possibly be the most gloriously fun part I’ve ever stared down the barrel of playing. It is just so juicy

I love how throughout you continue to put Loki on some kind of pedestal of regal magnificence and then consistently tear him down. He gets battered, punched, blasted, side-swiped, roared at, sent tumbling on his back, and every time he gets back up smiling, wickedly, never for a second losing his eloquence, style, wit, self-aggrandisement or grandeur, and you never send him up or deny him his real intelligence…. That he loves to make an entrance; that he has a taste for the grand gesture, the big speech, the spectacle. I might be biased, but I do feel as though you have written me the coolest part.

… But really I’m just sending you a transatlantic shout-out and first-bump, things that traditionally British actors probably don’t do. It’s epic.

Whedon wrote back with a simplistic response:

Tom, this is one of those emails you keep forever. Thanks so much. It’s more articulate (and possibly longer) than the script. I couldn’t be more pleased at your reaction, but I’ll also tell you I’m still working on it … Thank you again. I’m so glad you’re pleased. Absurd fun to ensue.

Best, (including uncharacteristic fist bump), joss.

(via captainofalltheships)

medievalpoc:

whoshavesthebarber replied to your post: The Black Count is Being Adapted for a…

The audiobook cover says “Orlando Jones” to me…

You know… I can totally see that!!!

image

image

ash-wednesday:

aramis-no:

I hope Pedro Pascal comes back next year to play Daario Naharis.

aahahahahaha omg

With blue or purple hair, damnit!

(via brigdh)

Tags: Pedro Pascal

martyr-eater:

Shield of Henry II of France, France, ca. 1555.

The battle scene at the center is thought to depict the victory of Hannibal and the Carthaginians over the Romans in Cannae in 216 B.C., which here could be interpreted as an allusion to the struggle of France against the Holy Roman Empire during the sixteenth century. In the strapwork borders are the intertwined letters: H for Henry II (reigned 1547–59); C for Catherine de Médicis, his queen; and possibly also D for Diane de Poitiers, his mistress. Interspersed with the initials are crescents, the king’s personal badge and a reference to the moon goddess Diana and her namesake Diane de Poitiers.

(via captainofalltheships)

medievalpoc:

The Black Count is Being Adapted for a New Film!

Tom Reiss’s The Black Count, which details the true story of Général Thomas Alexandre Dumas (father of author Alexandre Dumas), is being adapted into a film directed by Cary Fukunaga (director of HBO’s True Detective).

No actors have been named so far, although some people are already speculating that Howard Charles may be considered for the lead. He’s known for playing the role of Porthos on the BBC’s Three Musketeers:

image

You can read a bit more about this story and hear an interview with the book’s author here at Indiewire.

You can read an excerpt of The Black Count here.

Are you jealous of the swordplay? Do you ever wish you could get a little more in the way of kind of brutal killing action going on?

(Source: bellesfrench, via captainofalltheships)

dduane:

Some fascinating stuff here. But this bit brought me up short.

Though Victorian people were swearing in much the same way that we do today, not all the bad words of the time are as familiar as fucking bitch. Many of these words rich and strange are not swearwords per se but terms for topics so esoterically taboo that they would never have come up in polite conversation. In his 1785 “Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,” Francis Grose includes to huffle, which is “a piece of bestiality too filthy for explanation.” (The 1788 and 1823 editions decide that discretion is the better part of valor and fail to mention the bestial practice at all.) Grose also lists “to bagpipe, a lascivious practice too indecent for explanation.” Even Farmer and Henley, brave champions of obscenity who boldly explained fucking, refuse to define to bagpipe in their dictionary — they simply repeat Grose’s definition manqué. One hopes for something really spectacular from these words, but they are simply the Victorian version of blow job, slang for fellatio, a practice evidently much more shocking one or two centuries ago. Another popular Victorian word for this lascivity was gamahuche. It derives from French, so it probably was a euphemism used in order to lift the tone of huffle and bagpipe out of the gutter. It more properly means “mouth on genitals,” as it can be used for both fellatio and cunnilingus.

"Huffle…", though. Oh dear. (Leaving us with the terrible possibility that in some circumstances, "hufflepuff" is a verb.)

(via brigdh)