collectivehistory:

New York during 1959 summer blackout.

collectivehistory:

New York during 1959 summer blackout.

(via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

newyorker:

In a portfolio from our archive, the photographer Gilles Peress looks at late-night New York during the final months of the last millennium: http://nyr.kr/1octbsM

newyorker:

In a portfolio from our archive, the photographer Gilles Peress looks at late-night New York during the final months of the last millennium: http://nyr.kr/1octbsM

(Source: newyorker.com, via lettersfromtitan)

ktt:

New York by Eiko Ojala

(via lettersfromtitan)

pencilpushingenthusiast:

New York, New York

pencilpushingenthusiast:

New York, New York

(via lettersfromtitan)

lettersfromtitan:

“I’ll never forget the day Marilyn and I were walking around New York City, just having a stroll on a nice day. She loved New York because no one bothered her there like they did in Hollywood, she could put on her plain-jane clothes and no one would notice her. She loved that. So as we we’re walking down Broadway, she turns to me and says ‘Do you want to see me become her?’ I didn’t know what she meant but I just said ‘Yes’- and then I saw it. I don’t know how to explain what she did because it was so very subtle, but she turned something on within herself that was almost like magic. And suddenly cars were slowing and people were turning their heads and stopping to stare. They were recognizing that this was Marilyn Monroe as if she pulled off a mask or something, even though a second ago nobody noticed her. I had never seen anything like it before.” - Amy Greene, wife of Marilyn’s personal photographer Milton Greene

She was stunning. And the bottom photo here is one of my favorites.  But for the text.

(Source: beautilation)

"A federal judge finds New York City’s stop-and-frisk policy unconstitutional."

The Stop and Frisk ruling has complex results, and while technically a win, it’s not going to stop the unconstitutional harassment of black and brown men in New York.  I’m too disgusted to talk about it in depth, honestly.


Short form: Detroit is what happens if you do extreme austerity like the Republicans want.  New York didn’t do the austerity and is in way better condition, and imposing Detroit style austerity will be terrible for it.  On the macro-level, if we dismantle the county’s financial system as Republicans are saying we should do, New York will become Detroit what with the financial industry collapsing.

carolinealice:

There are roughly three New Yorks. There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born there, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size, its turbulence as natural and inevitable. Second, there is the New York of the commuter—the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night. Third, there is New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something. Of these trembling cities the greatest is the last—the city of final destination, the city that is a goal. It is this third city that accounts for New York’s high strung disposition, its poetical deportment, its dedication to the arts, and its incomparable achievements. Commuters give the city its tidal restlessness, natives give it solidity and continuity, but the settlers give it passion. And whether it is a farmer arriving from a small town in Mississippi to escape the indignity of being observed by her neighbors, or a boy arriving from the Corn Belt with a manuscript in his suitcase and a pain in his heart, it makes no difference: each embraces New York with the intense excitement of first love, each absorbs New York with the fresh yes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Edison Company… — E.B. White, ‘Here is New York’

carolinealice:

There are roughly three New Yorks. There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born there, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size, its turbulence as natural and inevitable. Second, there is the New York of the commuter—the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night. Third, there is New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something. Of these trembling cities the greatest is the last—the city of final destination, the city that is a goal. It is this third city that accounts for New York’s high strung disposition, its poetical deportment, its dedication to the arts, and its incomparable achievements. Commuters give the city its tidal restlessness, natives give it solidity and continuity, but the settlers give it passion. And whether it is a farmer arriving from a small town in Mississippi to escape the indignity of being observed by her neighbors, or a boy arriving from the Corn Belt with a manuscript in his suitcase and a pain in his heart, it makes no difference: each embraces New York with the intense excitement of first love, each absorbs New York with the fresh yes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Edison Company… — E.B. White, ‘Here is New York’

(via eshusplayground)