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Accessible in the library’s Elihu Reading Room, the book, entitled “Practicarum quaestionum circa leges regias…,” looks old but otherwise ordinary.

Delicate, stiff, and with wrinkled edges, the skin’s coloring is a subdued yellow, with sporadic brown and black splotches like an old banana. The skin is not covered in hair or marked by tattoos—except for a “Harvard Law Library” branding on its spine. Nothing about it shouts “human flesh” to the untrained eye.

The book’s 794th and final page includes an inscription in purple cursive: “the bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace.”

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— Remember the good old days when books were, on occasion, bound in human skin? Here is an article on some that Harvard discovered on their library shelves. (via johndonne)

(via brigdh)

explore-blog:

New favorite site: Corpus Libris, which applies the concept of analog augmented reality to book covers. Best thing since Sorted Books.

(via this isn’t happiness)

(via lettersfromtitan)

Tags: Books Art

Confession Time

As exhausting as clearing the storage unit is proving to be, I have to admit unpacking the books was fun.  It was like a combination of opening wonderful presents and seeing old friends. 

Personal: Shelving observation:

 For someone who isn’t a Christian, I own a massive about of Christian theology books.  (It’s a Classical and medieval history thing.  I need to decide which to get rid of as I need the space.  The issue is, I kept a lot of things for reference that I don’t really need anymore as I’m out of academia.  What are the odds of me rereading Erasmus?  Ought I get rid of all my foreign language stuff while I’m at it?  What are the odds of me reading homer in the original again?  The Aeneid?  Baudelaire?  I hate weeding my library.

Nothing makes me feel quite as much as a lapsed Johnnie as sorting and shelving my books.

It’s early modern, actually.

Tags: Art Books

haxanmovie:

Haxan Blog Dark/Alt/Grunge/Occult/Witchy

haxanmovie:

Haxan Blog Dark/Alt/Grunge/Occult/Witchy

Tags: Art Cat Books

the-absolute-best-posts:

novaffanculotu:

Candida Hofer - Libraries (published 2005)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via ghost-plot)

erikkwakkel:

Medieval pop-up book
This book was printed in 1482, when printing was just invented - by Johannes Gutenberg, c. 1455. It is remarkable what printers were able to do after two decades of experimenting with the new medium. As this image shows, they were able to produce a book that showed the movement of the moon with the help of cut-out “paper wheels”, which hovered in front of the page. You can just imagine how the printer who designed and produced this 3D page must have felt, over 550 years ago. What a thrill it must have been to produce one of the first pop-up books in the western world.
Glasgow, University Library, Sp.Coll. BD7-f.13 (incunabulum printed in Venice, 1482), taken from the library’s Flickr page.

erikkwakkel:

Medieval pop-up book

This book was printed in 1482, when printing was just invented - by Johannes Gutenberg, c. 1455. It is remarkable what printers were able to do after two decades of experimenting with the new medium. As this image shows, they were able to produce a book that showed the movement of the moon with the help of cut-out “paper wheels”, which hovered in front of the page. You can just imagine how the printer who designed and produced this 3D page must have felt, over 550 years ago. What a thrill it must have been to produce one of the first pop-up books in the western world.

Glasgow, University Library, Sp.Coll. BD7-f.13 (incunabulum printed in Venice, 1482), taken from the library’s Flickr page.

Tags: Art Books

the-city-council:

We stand by this statement, now and forever. Trust us when we say there are reasons.

the-city-council:

We stand by this statement, now and forever. Trust us when we say there are reasons.

(Source: notacoolkat)